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and then bringing him to new york city to face trial. within steps of the 9/11 memorial. fox news correspondent doug mckelway has our report. >> reporter: the not guilty plea in federal court this morning to one count of conspiracy to kill americans sets the stage for a high profile terrorist trial just blocks from ground zero. it reignites intense republican criticism of the obama administration for trying terrorism suspects in civilian courts where miranda rights apply. >> if this man right next to usama bin laden involved in the attacks on our country on 9/11, don't you think it would be important that we not tell him that he has the right to remain silent? >> reporter: ayotte along with senators mccain and graham today again condemned the decision in a statement that said, quote: >> r eporter: a family member of a 9/11 victim also weighed in. >> my concern is a guy like this comes to a civilian court, he's put away. hopefully, he would be convicted, but it wouldn't, it's not -- it's conspiracy. it's not murder. >> reporter: but the white house today defended its record of terrorist convictions i
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: grand central terminal celebrate its 100th birthday this month. it is a new new york icon with 750,000 people passing through every day. tom wolf once wrote, "every big city has a railroad station with the grand, to the point of glorious, classical architecture, but the grandest, mauve glorious of all by far was grand central station. in the 1970s, it was threatened with destruction. in the 1980s, it fell into disrepair. now grand central is stronger than ever. he were is a look behind the scenes. >> grand central is a place with a lot of secrets. one of them is hidden in plain sight it's room behind tiffany clock, which overlooks park avenue. today we go to places the public is never allowed to see, and we meet the characters who make sure the trains run on time. our first stop takes us from the highest point in grand central to the lowest. n-42 is the teenest basement in manhattan, and it provides the direct current which powers the trains. we meet with tradition ernie korkin. >> we are s
"gimme the loot." >> we really wanted to show a part of new york that isn't seen so much on movies and t.v. right now, i think. because a lot of people i know talk about how new york has become a mall and the big box stores. that's a part of new york but there's still this energy and there are these neighborhoods that are very much ale a very much still neighborhoods and so we wanted to go out into the bronx and all over the city and show that. >> rose: same-sex marriage and "gimme the loot" when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: it is an important week for the united states supreme court. starting on tuesday, the court will hearing amounts in two cases involving the legality of same-sex marriage. the nine justices will first consider an appeal of an earlier ruling that rendered california's proposition 8 unconstitutional. the 2008 ballot initiative banned same-sex marriage in the state. on wednesday the court will consider the constitutionality of the defense of marriage act, the 1996 law states tha
with an elevated elevator, he had a whole life outside of new york city that i'm going to talk about a little bit. but to give you some background because i think it's also relevant very much for some of the work i'm interested in today, he also had a legacy that extended beyond just the maps and sort of understanding property and the history of new york city. he's contributed data that has been very, very important for scientists who are working on projects today. and that actually is how i became interested in randel in the first place. there's the book, there's randel. later in life. the book came out of an article that i was doing on an exhibit that was here at the museum of the city of new york in 2009. eric johnson of the conservation society had moved to knight from california. he'd been browsing, and he'd happened to cross this book, manhattan and maps, which is an extraordinary collection of of new york city's history in maps that paul cohen and robert augustine did. and he was looking through it, and he fell upon this page. many of you are familiar with story, but i just want to explain
. from new york, i'm chris hayes. the u.s. secretary of state, john kerry, arrived in baghdad this morning on a surprise visit to iraq. his first since becoming secretary of state and pope plan sis at a palm sunday mass this morning. first of a week of ceremonies leading to easter. right now i want to talk about one of the most hotly debated police tactics in the country which was put on trial this week and n the federal court in manhattan. class action lawsuit against the northbound police department oar its controversial policy of stopping, questioning and frisking people on the street, a tactic known as stop and frisk it began on monday and unfolded in dramatic fashion with whistle blower police officers testifying against the nypd and stop and frisk breaking down on the stand. thursday, one of the trial's most explosive moments the court heard a recording of a conversation between a patrolman and commanding officer of the stop and frisk policy. in which the commanding officer seemed to suggest skin color can be a deciding forecast tore in who is stopped. conversation was r
to spend in new york amid fierce union protests and gary k, you say consumers everywhere should protest? >> it's amazing to watch this, in the city of new york, where there's a high cost of living. you have a company singlehandedly lowered cost for consumers and no, let's not build one. you're not going to have the workers. the construction workers, this is a loss for consumers all the way around in the city and tells you, i'v got to use the words, they're dummies, people not allowing this to occur. >> i tell you this is remarkable. everywhere i've been to a wal-mart, people happy they have jobs and democratizes things and-- >> wal-mart is an incredibly great american institution, a genuine benefit. everyone who lives near a wal-mart gets the benefits of a lower prices as if they had a substantial pay raise. these are union goons out there demonstrating and holding up pickets that are paid i'm sure by some union, and wal-mart nationwide unionize jobs and grocery stores will disappear. it's very, very upsetting phenomenon, seeing new yorkers to thrive in the benefits of wal-mart. >> it's
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: it is an important week for the united states supreme court. starting on tuesday, the court will hearing amounts in two cases involving the legality of same-sex marriage. the nine justices will first consider an appeal of an earlier ruling that rendered california's proposition 8 unconstitutional. the 2008 ballot initiative banned same-sex marriage in the state. on wednesday the court will consider the constitutionality of the defense of marriage act, the 1996 law states that the federal government will only recognize heterosexual marriages. the arguments come at a time when public opinion is shifted in favor of same-sex marriage. these two cases also promise to shape the legacy of the roberts court. joining me from new haven, connecticut, akhil amar, he's the sterling professor at yale law school. from washington, jeffrey toobin of cnn and the "new yorker" magazine. with me in new york, andrew sullivan, the author and editor of the dish blog. i'm pleased to have each of the
. >> here are the headlines, the "new york times" say justices say time may be wrong for ruling on gay marriage. >> i think this court very much wants to punt this bad boy back to the states as fast as they can get it there. they are more than hesitant to jump into this. >>> our special guests at the top of this hour, former rnc chairman, ken mehlman, and david cissilini. i want to start with ken mehlman, former rnc chair, former campaign manager for george bush's '04 campaign. it's been written about you that you are the highest profile gay republican in american history. it just crossed the wire from roi reuters that t-- >> i was actually in the hear g hearings yesterday in the oral argument, what i saw yesterday were justices that were taking a very serious issue, very seriously. they were asking a lot of tough questions to all three of the counsel that were appearing before them. what was interesting to me was that you heard from all sides two things that i think are important. one was how important the issue of marriage is. how central it is to an individual as a person, to their
's repeal of that ruling. yes, in new york city, it is called soda, which brings us to tonight's chart imitates life. as we were trying to understand this afternoon's ruling on sugary drinks, which is easier than understanding the regulations mayor bloomberg wants to impose on the afternoon coffee order, we came across this fabulous map of the u.s. one man's attempt to plot if soda is called pop or soda where you live. i can say soda. right now, i am in new york city. in the northeast, it is pure aquamarine soda country. also grew up in california, which is fairly solid soda country. looks like from ohio and michigan, all the way to washington state really, i might be more of a pop person. the south is solidly coke country, whether it is brand name coca-cola or not. if it is fizzy and tastes like coke but isn't coke. this asked people whether they are pop, soda, coke, or other person, where they grew up. you answer those questions, you will have helped fill out the survey. the results seem right to us, anecdotally. many of us took time to fill out the survey this afternoon and play wit
inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we started on this project in 1969. i'm a sandhog. i've been a sandhog for 37 years. narrator: sandhogs are the men of local 147, who work deep below the city. they began building the infrastructure of new york in 1872. from the subways to the sewers, the water tunnels to the highway tunnels, new york city thrives because of their work. ryan: you got one little hole in the ground, and nobody knows we're here. see the empire state building, right. that's 1,000 feet. so you figure, you go down
greeted the election of pope francis i with bells and in new york's st. patrick's cathedral, applause. at our lady of angels in los angeles the announcement was made in english and spanish. this latin american pope could help reach out to u.s. hispanics. 54% of whom identified as catholic in a recent gallup poll. >> latinos in the united states feel extremely proud this day. they see this man as a person that modernized the church in argentina and did so with a firm hand. they expect he will do the same right now from the vatican. >> reporter: a sentiment also expressed in miami. >> it's wonderful that we finally have a pope that can represent, you know, a large piece of community, the latinos and, you know, a lot of people who need the support. >> reporter: others voiced hope the new pope can reach out to disenchanted church members here in the united states. >> i'm rehema ellis at st. patrick's cathedral in new york where american catholics are excited, saying they hope the new pope will help repair the church and relate to a younger generation of catholics. >> reporter: that's the
path. people like to do faster in new york cheaper but it is long term solutions to the long-term problems. >> host: the book is to detent pages long the first 175 deal overall with characterizing the problem. the remaining 40 pages is a chapter that talks about marvelous science and then the last 10 pages you concrete the talk about solutions that you want to recommend. headed toward the last few minutes, you see the possibility for a second book that talks more? the book even works more to where we need to go what about that? >> i am not sure my marriage would survive. [laughter] my book just cannot today. it is wonderfully premature to talk about the second book. with the vision with the spirit of your question, it is heavy pointed up the problem and starts a conversation about solutions. that in order to have a public conversation and people need to be focused on the problem. the charitable sector, the number and the impact in the importance that people don't put time and effort into the donation process shocks people. i hope the public understands it is the tremendously
." >>> good evening, i'm chris matthews in new york. let me start tonight with this. i am rarely startled by political opinions but the other day i heard a college student say he believes people have the right to walk into any bar, restaurant, hockey game, nfl stadium, openly carrying a firearm. they have a right to do this and he suggests duty to insist on that right. i think of the world this would create, go into a bar midnight friday, people are all over the place carrying, packing. all have loaded guns. handy for use. all can drink all they want. no one will take away their drink and certainly no one will take away their gun in their holster. how long will it take for the combination of alcohol and attitude and the presence of bad drugs to detonate into a gunfight? how long will it take before someone had, well, five or ten drinks and getting ticked off at that guy looking at his girlfriend? that guy who staid something about his favorite sports team? that guy who he doesn't like the looks of, that guy who's shooting his mouth off? this is the concoction of my imagination only becaus
unemployment rate of the obama's presidency. osama bin laden's son-in-law faces charges in a new york city courtroom near ground zero. critics say there's a et abouter way to bring him to justice. >>> and justin bieber's on-stage health scare. an ending to a bad week. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." wall street just closed another record-setting day with the dow jones industrials hitting a new all-time high. this after the release of the february jobs numbers that were much better than so many of the analysts expected. america's unemployment rate fell to 7.7%. that's the lowest level since december 2008, the month before president obama took office. the u.s. economy added 236,000 jobs last month. that's almost double the new hires in january. alison kosik is at the new york stock exchange. >> the markets are happy about it. the dow, wolf, continues to make history. the strong jobs report fueling the dow. today's close marks the fourth straight all-time high this week. these bulls, they just keep on running. look at the dow. it's now 200 points above the initial high we we
door and it would be okay. >> reporter: some in new york welcomed the judge's decision. >> i think it's great. there should have not been a ban in general. >> reporter: the american beverage association issued a statement saying it provides a sigh of relief to new yorkers and thousands of small businesses in new york city that would have been harmed by this arbitrary and unpopular ban. it's not the first time new york mayor michael bloomberg tried to enact laws to effect public health. bloomberg forced restaurants to post calorie information and ban artificial transfats in restaurant foods. in a city of more than 8 million, where the obesity epidemic is responsible for more than 5,000 deaths a year, the mayor says his fight to make new yorkers healthier will continue. >> overseas now, after more than 11 years of war, we're once again reminded that american lives are at stake in afghanistan every day. yesterday marked the deadliest day of the year for u.s. forces in the country. two separate events took the lives of seven american troops a helicopter crash in southern afghanistan kille
to the new york pd. and they developed it and then it went across the country. mr. gaston just used part of it and developed his own and used it the way that he has also developed the neighborhood courts that were invented by castro in cuba. and secondly briefly is that i read an article in the new york times on cold blooded murder and it kind of hit me, because san francisco has 1000 unsolved murders. so, i sent a letter to the new york times that a woman that wrote us and also she wanted the new york in it and the new york pd to start opening cold cases. murders that were unsolved and now the link is that they have gotten hundreds and hundreds of cases from across the united states and other police departments going into new york and seeing the data base for unsolved murders and so i sent out a letter and copies of the letters that i am giving you on the story that i sent to the nypd and the new york city commission, the police commission, to share data bases because i know that san francisco is going back to the murder that was in the marina were i, i ded the murder not the suspect. t
the latest at foxnews.com. we'll see you in a minute. >>> walmart scaling back plans to expand to new york amid fierce protests. consumers everywhere should protest they say. >> it's amazing to watch this, in a city like new york where there is high cost of living. you have a company that single handedly has lowered costs for consumers and let's not build one. you won't have the workers or construction workers, potential for local suppliers. this is a big loss for consumers all the way around the city. it tells you, i have to use the word they are dummies not allowing this to occur. >>> i have to tell you. everywhere i have been to walmart, it creates jobs. only rich people had access to. >> walmart is great american institution and genuine benefit. everyone gets the benefits of lower prices if they had a substantial pay raise. this is union goons out there demonstrating that are being paid by some unions. it's a very, very upsetting phenomenon to see new yorkers deprived from the benefits of walmart. >> what is disgusting about it, i'm a union guy. >> where are you coming from. >> you are
, little charlotte. he moved to new york city in 1948, where benny goodman hire him and he became very famous in new york at the time and he died in new york in 2001. one of the pieces of my ticket to ride is how many cubans of irish ancestry are there. because this connected to my family, that's why i wanted to read it to you. in the 40's, my father moved to new york in search of his destiny. he learned to make brillantine in red, blue and golden colors to give a beautiful sheen to the hair. in his spare time, when he could break free from his alchemist's captive vit, he would go listen to cuban music at the park plaza hotel in manhattan. those were happy times and years later became a happy tomic with me, convinced early on that my father inhabited a magic world. a few years ago, while listening to a recording of cuban blues by chico, i remembered in new york in those stories of the 40's that chico and my father met at club cuba in manhattan and again in havana in the mid-50's. the sessions of chico's house in our neighborhood became so famous that even my father, not particularly fo
off along the coastline. d.c., philly, up towards new york, a number of areas will be fighting with very marginal conditions as far as temperatures are concerned to get some of these type of snowfall numbers. places like new york city, 47 degrees today for your daytime high. it will take a lot to get the snow to accumulate with the higher sun angle. a slushy one to maybe three inches in the daytime monday. evening hours may have a chance for light accumulation including areas through new england. lesterer? >>> overseas secretary of state john kerry delivered a blunt message to the government of iraq today. it was all about what's happening with syria and iran. nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell is with the secretary in baghdad. >> reporter: john kerry is the first secretary of state to come to iraq since hillary clinton in 2009. it's his first visit since he came as a senator at the height of the civil war in 2006. arriving today in secrecy, in the week when iraq saw some of its worst terrorist attacks in years to mark the tenth anniversary of the war. bu
? >> on september 23, 1960, after a great deal of preparation, he left his summer home in sag harbor, new york, on long island. the european end of long island. he and charlie set off in his camper van, a pickup truck with a camper almost like a sailboat cabin or a boat cabin on top, set into the bed of the pickup truck. >> we will show it in a minute. >> he took off on september 23 and headed north the message uses and visited his kid at school near deerfield. then he made his way up to the top of main. -- manine. for some strange reason he thought he had to touch the top of maine first. he found out how big maine is. he worked his way -- he went to bangor and up to port kent, the top of maine, and drops down. >> how many days was he on the road? >> 75, maybe 77 at the most. no one knows for sure. he kept no notes. there were no records, no expense reports i can find or that anybody had. i know when he started thomas september 23, 1960. i know he was -- he mailed something from tallahatchie, mississippi december 19 60. he was pushing hard to get home. he was sick of the road and trying to g
american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoirs. in the new york city system, water is collected and stored in 19 reservoirs, which can hold more than a year's supply -- over 580 billion gallons of water. almost all of the system is fed by gravity, without the use of energy-consum
with new york city mayor michael bloomberg right in the middle of it. he is using his own money -- and he's a billionaire -- to finance an ad campaign for universal background checks for gun purchases. that got under way today. our report tonight from nbc's ron mott. >> reporter: he's got one of the biggest personal bankrolls in america. >> this year there will be 12,000 people killed in this country with handguns -- illegal handguns. >> reporter: tonight michael bloomberg is spending some of his fortune on a new ad campaign. >> for me, guns are for hunting and protecting my family. >> reporter: aimed at boosting support for universal background checks in the senate's upcoming vote. >> background checks have nothing to do with taking guns away from anyone. >> reporter: the ads are the work of mayors against illegal guns, a group cofounded by new york city's mayor seven years ago. on "meet the press" mr. bloomberg argued senate votes should reflect vast public support for universal background checks confirmed in recent polling. >> if 90% of the public wants something and their representati
this storm taking aim at new york city. hi there. how much snow can the northeast expect today? >> depends where you are. if you live in new york city good news you are talking one, two, maybe three inches as far as the snowfall goes. it will be windy it will be a messy day if you are doing any commuting on the roadways or the airport plan on delays. even places like washington, d.c. could be picking up snow. it's philadelphia along the i 95 corridor we could get a little more snow. 3-5 inches forecast out there. this is a very elevated snowfall. the higher you go into elevations the more snow across parts of atlantic. areas out west you are talking 4-8 inches widespread. some spots in illinois have picked up already 15 inches of snow a lot of snow with the system. winter storm warnings into effect in places like illinois, indiana, ohio, but as far east as new jersey. those areas could be picking up 3-5 inches of snow out there. southern areas in new jersey. wind will be an issue gusting up to 30-40 miles per hour. that could cause delays. again still seeing that snow coming down in the no
to the party faithful. even taking a swipe at new york mayor michael bloomberg's decision to regulate soda. >> bloomberg's not around, our big gulp's safe. >> reporter: a rousing response. >> she's on fire. >> reporter: but the former vice presidential nominee has been out of political office since 2009. bringing into question palin's sway with the party and the conservative movement. among those trying to fill the leadership void, tea party favorite senator ted cruz who headlined the event this evening. >> do we surrender? or do we stand up now? >> reporter: it was a three-day conference marked by the discordant voices of potential 2016 contenders. >> the face of the republican party needs to be the face of every american, and we need to be the party of inclusion and acceptance. >> we don't need a new idea. there is an idea. the idea is called america. and it still works. >> the new gop will need to embrace liberty in both the economic and the personal sphere. >> reporter: party insiders warn republicans need to find a clear direction and learn the lessons of last year's stinging presiden
america's enemies to justice. the u.s. attorney for the southern district of new york says this man has been working against the united states for 13 years. and we now know the ingenls community tracked them through out the mid eels for years before picking him up in jordan. >> the history is somebody that has been active and engaged in al qaeda. as spent some time in iran the southern part of iran and planning during facilitation during al qaeda business. >> they hahe has been brought t united states for trial since he was an enemy combatant and someone from al qaeda's inner circle the same protections as an american citizen. >> people killed over 2900 americans and now we have our hands on him why in the world are we treating him as if he is some kind of criminal and why in the world is he not at guantanamo bay. >> we are a few hours away from his hearing in new york. he may be charged with tearrism and maybe murder as well. >>> we will watch and see what happens. appreciate it. >> that brings us to our question of the morning and a look at who is talking. we are bringing you john bol
there is a disturbance in the force. >> i want you to look at this picture. this is new york city. isn't this soupy and disgusting. this is what it looks like in new york city. you have inclement weather out there. we'll say good morning to you. rainy, sloshy, snowy and icky. >> it's just gross out there. >>> now the news you have been waiting for. >> now to a galaxy far, far away. >> there is a disturbance in the force. han, leia and luke are all in talks to be part of the new "star wars" films to be announced after disney purchased the rights. it's out there now. they could be back for part of the t new films. >> i never would say that. you know i never say that to anybody. >> you're right. >> that's all for "early start." >> "starting point" starts now. >>> welcome, everybody. today, osama bin laden's son-in-law caught and brought to new york under a shroud of secrecy. what happens next? >>> and details on how a lion killed a young woman. that wild animal wasn't where it belonged. former president clinton urging the supreme court to overturn a law he signed when he was in the w
, smooth skin with olay. >>> good morning from new york i'm chris hayes. the eurozone and cyprus overnight agreed to a $13 billion bailout deal one that would put much of the cost on the bank depositors. pope francis had his first meeting with the media. right now i'm joined by anthony butler, roland frameeny and jacqueline and my friend father bill daly. great to have you here on this saturday morning. on wednesday cardinal jorge mario bergoglio of argentina was elected through a secret ballot to be the 266th pontiff of the roman catholic church. cardinal jorge mario bergoglio now pope francis is 76 years old, the first jesuit pope and the first pope from latin america a region of the world that along with africa has represent ad major source of growth for the catholic church. in 1910, 65% of all catholics resided in europe, 24% in latin america and caribbean. now the church looks radically different. in 2010, 24 catholics resided in europe. the elevation of jorge mario bergoglio to the papacy represents an acknowledgement of the cardinals of the demographic power centers but other elemen
president biden teamed up with new york mayor michael bloomberg today to push for new gun control laws. biden made an emotional appeal for action. >> for all those who say we shouldn't or couldn't ban high capacity magazines, i just ask them one question, think about newtown. think about newtown. think about how many of these children or teachers may be alive today had he had to reload three times as many times as he did. think about what happened out in where gabby giffords, my good friend, was shot and wounded. think about when that young man had to try to change the clip. had he only had a ten-round clip when he changed the clip and fumbled and had it knocked out of his hand, how many more people would have been alive? and tell me how it violates anyone's constitutional right to be limited to a clip that holds ten rounds instead of 30, or in aurora a hundred? >> let's get more on the vice president's emotional appeal for new gun laws. susan candiotti with the speech, the backdrop of new york city, the mayor and involving a number of family members from the connecticut shooting. >> r
. >> today i'm announcing i'm officially running to be the mayor of the great city of new york. >>> what do women really want? i'll talk to four very successful females about supposedly having it all. do they think getting to the top is as simple as two words, lean in? >>> also, the undercover reporter who walked into the texas gun show and walked out with an ar-15, no questions asked. this is "piers morgan live." >>> good evening. we're live at the vatican where the work of electing a new pope is about to begin. tomorrow morning, the cardinals, 115 of them, they hold a mass at st. peter's basilica which will be open to the public in the afternoon, and process to the sistine chapel where they will swear an oath of secrecy. once they close the doors the conclave begins and the world will have no hint of what's going on inside until white smoke begins rising from the chapel chimney. it's all very exciting for us catholics and it could be a long wait. the longest conclave of the past hundred years went on for five days. so batten down and brace yourselves for the long slog of deciding who the
. >> they see president obama and new york city the same day netanyahu does and instead goes on a daily talk show. >> disrespectful of prime minister netanyahu? really? let's hear what that man said today, the prime minister himself. >> i want to thank you for the investment you have made in our relationship and in strengthening the friendship and appliance between our two countries. it is deeply, deeply appreciated. >> in a visit important to our nation's security, the republican attacks against this president's foreign policy seemed puny, especially when the president and prime minister were actually laughing. >> and i want to express a special thanks to sarah as well as your two sons for their warmth and hospitality. it was wonderful to see them. they are -- i did inform the prime minister that they are very good looking young men who clearly got their looks from their mother. >> well, i can say the same of your daughters. >> this is true. our goal is to improve our gene pool by marrying women better than we are. >> this is the reality. the gop consistently tries to paint the president as
park avenue apartment in new york city. he's accused of trading inside information. prosecutors say he was at the center of the week criminal club. he entered a not guilty plea and is now on $2 million bail. this video was shot by this woman that we have on our show. welcome to the show. how did it go down this morning? >> well, you know, we have been watching this for a while. we reported on it a while back. so before dawn this morning, about 6:00 a.m., bunch of fbi agents pulled up in cars. the. gerri: how long did you know? >> i was not sure this was going to happen. we have been on the lookout for it. you know, it's something that i wouldn't normall do. it only took moments, it was very swift. they brought him out in hives, put him in the car and drove off the. gerri: this guy, he is a big deal on wall street. he is a portfoliomanager from one of the companycountry's biggest hedge fund managers. we know? >> is the highest-ranking person to be ensnared in this investigation. which is ongoing and has been a very big deal. he has been attacked since 1997. you know, he's only 40 years
are four of the mega states, california, pennsylvania, illinois, and new york, and they won ohio and florida twice. the whole country is trending democratic, and when you are at 9 million or 11 million hispanics, or illegal immigrants are made american citizens, by three to one they're going to vote democratic, and there goes texas. >> okay, gop is old. is that the answer to the gop? >> the gop of old has grown stale and moss covered. >> the gop. or grand old party, is just that. old. so says kentucky senator rand paul, age 50. paul gained international status when he filibustered for 13 hours the white house's legal rationale for drone killing. paul's filibuster took heat from republican old guard members like john mccain who referred to paul as a, quote unquote, wacko bird. in fact, paul was the star at cpac, the conservative political action conference held two weeks ago. cpac is a testing ground for politicians eyeing a run. this year was no different. president in ng for president i 2016. ng for president in 20ng the strathe paul, 25%. marco rubio, florida paul, 25%. marco r
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